Great Northern Passenger Depot

 

We Have The Depot.  Contract for the Great Northern Passenger Depot Let Yesterday.  To Be Finished This Year.  An Imposing Stone Edifice Corner DeMers Avenue and Sixth St.  Agent St. John last evening received the following dispatch.  St. Paul, August 3. – H. H. St. John:  I am happy to inform you that the contract for the construction of the Grand Forks passenger depot was closed today, and the same will be finished this season.  A. L. Mohler, Genl. Manager.  The dispatch assures the citizens of Grand Forks that the new passenger station so long promised so long expected and so long waited is at last to be built.  The site is the one long since selected, just west of the Griggs house, corner of DeMers avenue and sixth.  The structure will be an imposing edifice of stone, commodious and architecturally attractive, alike creditable to the Great Northern road and to the most important point on its lines, the metropolis of North Dakota.  The work of construction will begin at once.  The HERALD has rarely had the pleasure of bringing more welcome and gratifying news to the people of Grand Forks.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Tuesday Morning, August 4, 1891, Volume XX, Number 225, Page 5)

Great Northern Passenger Depot.  In the few moments given to Genl. Manager Mohler, while passing through the city yesterday morning, as announced elsewhere in these columns, he stated that as wired Agent St. John, Monday evening, the contract had been let for the immediate construction of the new stone depot building of the Great Northern and the contract signed by Messrs. Moore and Hackett of Minneapolis.  As has been stated heretofore, it will be the handsomest building on any road out side of St. Paul, Minneapolis or Duluth.  It wil be 137×60, two stories high and built of Kettle River sand stone and will front on DeMers avenue between the Griggs House and the freight depot.  Work will be commenced immediately and the building completed by the first of December.  It will be fitted up with all the modern conveniences and have the best of accommodations.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Wednesday Morning, August 5, 1891, Volume XX, Number 226, Page 5)

The contract for building the new Great Northern passenger depot for Grand Forks has been let to Moore & Hackett, of Minneapolis.  Work will be commenced at once and (should be) completed Dec. 1.  It will be 137×60, two stories of Kettle river stone, fronting on DeMers avenue.  (The Princeton Union, Thursday, August 13, 1891, Volume XV, Number 34, Page 6)

Dinnie Bros. have secured the contract for the brick work on the new passenger depot of the Great Northern.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Wednesday Morning, August 19, 1891, Volume XX, Number 234, Page 5)

Jack Dinnie commenced laying the foundation of the new Great Northern depot yesterday.  Of course the work will go on with a rush with Jack behind it.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Thursday Morning, August 27, 1891, Volume XX, Number 241, Page 5)

Six car loads of stone have arrived to be used in the new Great Northern depot, the work on which is progressing rapidly.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Tuesday Morning, September 8, 1891, Volume XX, Number 250, Page 5)

The New Depot Causing a General Wake Up on DeMers.  The walls of the new Great Northern passenger depot, are now well up to the second story and an idea can now be had of the general appearance of the building when completed.  It will be the finest depot between St. Paul and the coast, and Grand Forks has occasion to feel proud of it.  The erection of the station at the upper end of DeMers ave. will make a great difference to that thoroughfare, and it is but reasonable to expect that the lively traffic of the early eighties will come brick that street again.  The prophecy of those days that DeMers ave. was destined to be one of the principal streets of the city is about to be in a measure fulfilled, and the numerous vacant store rooms will once more be peopled with busy and prosperous tradesmen.  After a Rip Van Winkle sleep of five years, DeMers avenue is waking up to the progress of Grand Forks and will henceforth be found right up with the band wagon.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Wednesday Morning, September 23, 1891, Volume XX, Number 260, Page 5)

Cass Gilbert, the architect of the new depot, was among yesterday’s visitors.  He came to see what progress was being made on the building.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Saturday Morning, September 26, 1891, Volume XX, Number 262, Page 5)

Work will be commenced upon moving the Great Northern freight house next Sunday.  It will probably be deposited in its permanent resting place the same day.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Saturday Morning, October 3, 1891, Volume XX, Number 267, Page 5)

The walls of the new passenger depot are almost completed and carpenters are framing the roof timbers.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Tuesday Morning, October 13, 1891, Volume XX, Number 274, Page 5)

Contractor Dietz who is building the Great Northern depot here, left last evening for Bozeman, Mont., where he has secured the contract for erecting a new passenger depot.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Wednesday Morning, October 14, 1891, Volume XX, Number 275, Page 5)

Wm. H. Ulmer, of St. Paul, contractor in cut stone and mason work, was in the city yesterday.  Mr. Ulmer furnished the stone for the new St. John block (and) also for the Great Northern depot.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Wednesday Morning, October 14, 1891, Volume XX, Number 275, Page 5)

The roof timbers of the new passenger depot were being placed in position yesterday.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Friday Morning, October 16, 1891, Volume XX, Number 276, Page 5)

Dinnie Bros. have about completed the brick work on the new passenger depot.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Sunday Morning, October 18, 1891, Volume XX, Number 277, Page 5)

Two switch engines work night and day in the Great Northern yards.  When the yard system is completed most of the switching will be done from the west end, which will put a stop to the frequent blockade of Third and Fourth streets.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Sunday Morning, October 18, 1891, Volume XX, Number 277, Page 5)

The Great Northern Yards Fast Assuming Metropolitan Proportions.  People who have not walked through the Great Northern yards recently are not aware of the great extent of the improvements being made.  There are now over seven miles of side tracks, and the yard is being made the most complete and convenient one west of St. Paul.  The permanent nature of the improvements being made, together with the new passenger depot, indicates that some radical changes in the arrangements of their system are to be made.  The natural point for division headquarters between St. Paul and Great Falls, Mont., is Grand Forks, and the arrangement of the passenger depot is certainly such as to lead to the belief that it was planned to accommodate division officials, train dispatchers, and all the functionaries of a division headquarters.  There is more in the movements of the Great Northern than appears on the surface.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Sunday Morning, October 18, 1891, Volume XX, Number 277, Page 5)

Work will be commenced on Monday cutting away the rear ends of S. W. McLaughlin and Mrs. Gilbreath’s buildings to make way for the passenger side tracks.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Sunday Morning, October 18, 1891, Volume XX, Number 277, Page 5)

The last stone has been laid upon the new depot structure and the roof will soon be finished.  It is safe to say that before Dec. 1st trains will be stopping at the new station.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Tuesday Morning, October 27, 1891, Volume XX, Number 283, Page 4)

The Cole triangular building has been moved away for the resting place it has so long and peacefully enjoyed, and there is nothing left to obstruct the passenger tracks to the new depot.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Tuesday Morning, October 27, 1891, Volume XX, Number 283, Page 4)

Great Northern surveyors are laying out the new Y. from the new passenger depot to the old one.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Wednesday Morning, October 28, 1891, Volume XX, Number 284, Page 5)

Cass Gilbert, of St. Paul, the architect of the new Great Northern depot, was in the city yesterday, inspecting its progress.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Friday Morning, November 6, 1891, Volume XXI, Number 5, Page 5)

The Great Northern tower clock will arrive from Boston next week.  An expert will be sent from the factory to place it in position.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Saturday Morning, November 28, 1891, Volume XXI, Number 24, Page 5)

The mammoth clock for the Great Northern tall tower is here and the expert will be here from Boston next week to place it in position.  The tower will be illuminated at night by electricity, so that the hour may be ascertained from all parts of the city day or night, which will be a great convenience to the general public.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Friday Morning, December 4, 1891, Volume XXI, Number 29, Page 5)

Page 5.  The Business of the St. Paul Roofing and Cornice Works.  One of the most enterprising institutions in the city is the St. Paul Roofing and Cornice works, whose works are located at the west end of Wabasha street bridge.  The proprietors, Messrs. Lefebvre & Deslauriers, are both practical men, and have, by close attention to business, built up a trade second to none in their line in the Northwest.  They have made and put up some of the finest copper and galvanized iron work ever used in this section…

Page 6.  This firm make a specialty of pressed and spun metal work in all metals.  This class of work has become very popular with the trade, and as the merits of the same become known is taking the place of wood carving on all large buildings.  They are now busy at work on the slate roofing and copper and galvanized iron work on the depots at Grand Forks and Willmar for the Great Northern railroad, and on the depot at Bozeman for the Northern Pacific railway.  (The Saint Paul Daily Globe, Monday Morning, December 7, 1891, Volume XIII, Number 341)

The big tower clock has arrived and the expert has been telegraphed for to come and set it up, and it will probably be placed in position by the end of the week.  The correct time can then be seen from all parts of the city, which will be quite cheering intelligence to the boys having their watches in pawn.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Tuesday Morning, December 8, 1891, Volume XXI, Number 32, Page 5)

The new depot will be occupied by the 20th inst.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Wednesday Morning, December 9, 1891, Volume XXI, Number 33, Page 5)

The big tower clock will be doing business in a week or so, the expert having arrived from the factory to set it up.  G. N. passenger trains will begin stopping at the new station about the first of the year, or as soon as the water tank to supply the engines is completed.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Saturday Morning, December 19, 1891, Volume XXI, Number 39, Page 5)

The Great Northern’s big clock was placed in position in the tower of the new depot yesterday.  The clock was made by the Seth Thomas clock works of Boston.  The dials are six feet in diameter, and the time may be readily distinguished from nearly any part of the city.  The dials will be illuminated at night.  The people of Grand Forks will appreciate the enterprise of the Great Northern railway in providing the clock.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Friday Morning, December 25, 1891, Volume XXI, Number 44, Page 5)

The Great Northern tower clock stopped yesterday afternoon at 1:30.  The weather is a little too cold for it, frost accumulating in the works, and it refuses to do service.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Saturday Morning, January 2, 1892, Volume XXI, Number 48, Page 5)

The new regulator for the new passenger station has just arrived and will be placed in position as soon as it is ready for occupancy.  It is the finest timepiece on the entire line.  It is once more given out that the new station will be occupied in about ten days.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Tuesday Morning, January 5, 1892, Volume XXI, Number 50, Page 5)

Finally Completed.  The New Passenger Station Now Ready for Occupancy.  The finishing touches were put on the new Great Northern passenger station last evening, and it now stands ready for occupancy.  Trains will stop there as soon as the connections are completed for the new water tank, which has been built to supply passenger engines exclusively.  The building has been partially described before, but as it stands complete today it looks more than ever an ornament to the city; a monument to the liberal policy of the company as regards Grand Forks and the northwest, and a credit to all those concerned in the erection of it.  The structure is of Kettle River sand stone, two stories in height except the baggage room addition, with a slate roof over all.  From one extremity of the platform to the other it is 153×59 feet.  The waiting rooms on the first floor are each 35×40 feet, seated with benches finished in antique oak.  The ticket office is 12×18 and there also convenient and commodious toilet rooms on this floor.  The baggage room is 30×35 feet in size.  The lower rooms have maple floors and are finished with wainscoating of Georgia pine.  Peculiar significance may be attached to the arrangement of the second floor.  It is divided into seven large rooms with corridor running between.  They are admirably adapted to office purposes, and the prediction that this place is to be division headquarters for the Northern Minnesota and Dakota lines seems to be well founded.  The tower which surmounts the structure contains the room, thirteen feet square in which is placed the monster clock with dials seven feet in diameter.

Cass Gilbert, of St. Paul, was the architect, and superintendent of the building, and while it can not be said that he “builded wiser than he knew,” the fact that he built well is undeniable.  E. C. Long & Co. of St. Paul, were the general contractors and had entire general supervision of the work, although they sublet a great deal of it to parties here.  They have performed their contract with entire satisfaction to the architect and the company.  W. H. Ulmer had the contract for the stone work and shipped every piece marked and ready to be laid, from his yard in St. Paul.  It was from Ring & Tobin’s quarries on Kettle river.  Dinnie Bros. were the contractors for the brick work, which insured that the job, which by the way was no small one, would be properly done.  The painting was done by our own original Beyer, and the work shows his customary excellence.  The plumbing which is not the least important of the work was done by Spriggs, Block & Co., of this city, and the general contractors are very highly pleased with it.  The carpenter work was done by A. F. Turner, and although he has had several other large contracts on hand during the time, he has been right up to date with this one and has done a first class job.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Sunday Morning, January 10, 1892, Volume XXI, Number 55, Page 5)

Architect Cass Gilbert returned to St. Paul last night.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Sunday Morning, January 10, 1892, Volume XXI, Number 55, Page 5)

Carpenters are casing the big clock room in the tower at the depot.  Radiators will be placed therein and the huge time piece will be running again next week.  Jeweler Gansl will place the regulator in the new station today.  It is the finest clock in the west.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Tuesday Morning, January 12, 1892, Volume XXI, Number 56, Page 5)

The Y connecting the eastern and northern Great Northern tracks will be completed in a short time.  Several travelers after walking through the cold to the old G. N. passenger depot were surprised and disgusted to find that trains arrived and departed from the new depot and some of them made a few extemporaneous remarks which would not sound at all well in polite society.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Thursday Morning, January 14, 1892, Volume XXI, Number 58, Page 5)

The work of demolishing the buildings of the old passenger stations has commenced, the platforms being already torn away.  The passenger tracks cannot be connected with the north line until the buildings are out of the way.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Friday Morning, January 15, 1892, Volume XXI, Number 59, Page 5)

The G. N. tower clock was started again Thursday afternoon and was running at dark last night.  If it stops again a radiator will be placed in the room, and it will be kept heated during the colder weather.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Saturday Morning, January 16, 1892, Volume XXI, Number 60, Page 5)

The demolition of the building at the old passenger station is progressing rapidly.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Sunday Morning, January 17, 1892, Volume XXI, Number 61, Page 5)

The big clock tower runs all right now and the two hundred pound weight makes the wheels revolve in perfect time.  The regulator in the waiting room has been adjusted to a nicety and its accuracy may be depended upon.  (Grand Forks Daily Herald, Tuesday Morning, January 19, 1892, Volume XXI, Number 62, Page 5)

 

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