Saint Cloud Tornado University of Minnesota Response

It is stated that the faculty of the state university will to-day visit St. Cloud and Sauk Rapids for the purpose of “inspecting the wreck wrought by the cyclone, and of discovering, if possible, any facts which may throw light upon the matter of the cause or avoidance of these terrible disastrous storms.”  It is understood that the faculty expects to have the study of cyclones hereafter inserted in the curriculum, and will use the state experimental farm for the purpose of giving practical as well as theoretical illustrations of the origin, growth and characteristics of these rotary wind storms.

Source:
The Saint Paul Daily Globe
Friday Morning, April 23, 1886
Volume VIII, Number 113, Page 3

 

The faculty of the state university [University of Minnesota] will give a scientific analysis of the effects of the cyclone in Sauk Rapids and St. Cloud at a public meeting, to be given for the benefit of the relief fund on Saturday.  Mayor Ames will preside.  The finance committee is Judge Young, Gov. Pillsbury and J. E. Bell.

Source:
The Saint Paul Daily Globe
Wednesday Morning, April 28, 1886
Volume VIII, Number 118, Page 3

 

FROM SCIENCE’S STANDPOINT.

An Entertainment for the Benefit of Cyclone Sufferers.

An audience, not large in numbers, but composed of the representative people of the city, assembled at Leland rink last evening to hear the recent cyclone at Sauk Rapids and St. Cloud discussed by able and scientific men.  The stage was a regular sea of flowers, and presented the appearance of a fairy bower.  From the ceiling over the center of the stage hung a banner nearly trimmed with evergreens, and bearing in its center a red cross – the sign of humanity.  Just below was suspended a large anchor composed of roses, carnations, pinks and evergreens.  At the back of the stage, half way between the floor and ceilings were the words, “Welcome” of evergreen, on a white background.  On the right side of the stage and extending toward the end of the hall, was a large map of St. Cloud, also one of Sauk Rapids.  Near the stage were diagrams and charts used by Prof. Hall, while delivering his lecture on How Cyclones or Tornados are Caused.  On the other side was a screen on which the pictures of the ruins of the two cities were thrown.  The stage was occupied by Mayor Ames, who presided.  Prof. Hall and Prof. Snow and other representative men [were present].  Back of them sat the chorus, who at different times during the evening rendered several fine productions of music.  Prof. Frost opened the entertainment by detailing the terrible visitation and speaking of the helping hands which had been extended to the sufferers in their hour of need.  He was followed by Prof. Hall, who explained at some length how cyclones and tornadoes were caused.  Maps were shown to illustrate his remarks, which were listened to with rapt attention, and it is probable that those present learned more from his remarks than they could by reading a dozen books of the subject.  Prof. Chriss of Sauk Rapids read a letter giving a graphic description of the storm, which gave a very thorough account of how the clouds looked as they began to gather force, preparatory to swooping down upon the earth and in its mad fury leaving devastation in its course.  The letter was by an eye witness, and was in such forcible language that more than one tear was visible on the faces of tender-hearted persons.  After the reading of the letter the professor pointed out the site of the principal buildings destroyed and where the dead were found.  He showed where the cyclone was first seen and where it first struck.  Numerous relics of the cyclone stood upon the stage and possessed a weird, mournful interest as the speaker related incidents concerning them.  At the conclusion of the professor’s remarks the hall was darkened and a number of pictures of cyclonic scenes and ruins were thrown upon a large screen.  Mr. Edward A. Bromley, who had charge of this part of the entertainment, explained the pictures.  The one that attracted the most attention was the picture of a cyclone which passed through Huron, Dak., two years ago.

Source:
The Saint Paul Daily Globe
Sunday Morning, May 2, 1886
Volume VIII, Number 122, Page 3

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